Elva

(1891-Present) Elva was named after the first child to be born in the village.

Stories

**1891 - Present** One of the first homesteaders in what came to be known as the district of Elva was H. J. Archibald and his family. They came from the east in 1882 and settled northwest of where Elva was later built. Archibald established a post office out of his home, which received the mail once a week from Brandon. [[inline:right:elva]] In 1891 James Skelton agreed to sell some of his land to the [Canadian Pacific Railway](item=cpr-estevan-branch-saskatchewan), which was looking to continue the line west from Melita. An unincorporated village grew on a corner of Skelton’s land. The community was later named after the first baby to be born in the district: Elva, the daughter of James Modeland and his wife. Elva continued to grow, and by 1904 the community boasted a population of 100 people. Four years later the numbers had grown to 150 people, causing basis for a rumour that the community was at one time bigger than [Melita](item=melita). Elva seemed to be on the road to becoming a very important town—its [elevators](article=elva-elevator) serviced farmers as far south as the international boundary. But the community’s prosperity was not long-lived. Passenger service on the rail was terminated in 1959. In 1962 the stock yards by the tracks were demolished as it became more effective to ship cattle by road than rail. The railway continues to run through Elva, however the town is but a shadow of what it was a hundred years ago. Today the village is home to ...

[[inline:right:elva-elevator]] #The oldest remaining elevator in Canada! **~1892—Present** Grain elevators are an age-old symbol of western Canada – they stand like sentinels over ghost towns, communities and endless acres of farmland. The grain elevator was, and still is, the link between the farmer and the market, providing storage and serving as a shipping centre for bulk grain. However, the old-style wooden elevator does not have a secure future. Today super silos have taken over the job previously done by small, in-town elevators. Many of the old, and by comparison smaller, elevators are being torn down – in Manitoba the rate is roughly one elevator every two months. In this light, it is ever so much more impressive that one specific elevator has managed to survive to the present day. After the destruction of the Fleming elevator in Saskatchewan in 2010, the site of the oldest elevator in Canada became the small hamlet community of [Elva](article=elva), Manitoba. Elva is located halfway between [Melita](article=manchester-melita) and [Pierson](item=pierson) on the [Canadian Pacific Railway line](item=cpr-estevan-branch-saskatchewan). The elevator’s construction dates sometime between 1892 and 1899 and displays a characteristic squat style which was used prior to 1910. This design sets it apart from other prairie elevators. It was built by the Lake of the Woods Milling Company of Winnipeg, which was incorporated in 1887 with the intention of building and operating a network of grain elevators throughout western Canada. Before the turn of the century, the Lake of the Woods Milling Co was one of Manitoba’s ...