Heritage Features

Items Listed by Theme: Trails

Sites

Mandan-Hidatsa Village: Molander Site
(1780-1845) The site of an earthenlodge village belonging to either Mandan or Hidatsa existed on this site. Mandan villages along the Missouri River were connected to Canadian fur trading posts via the Mandan Trail.
Mandan Village: Double Ditch Site
(1500-1781) The ruins of a large Mandan village exists at this site. Remains of earthlodges, refuse mounds and two surrounding ditches are clearly discernible. Mandan villages were connected to Canadian fur trading posts via the Mandan Trail.
Mandan Village: Menoken Site
(1100-1845) At this site is a prehistoric earthlodge village surrounded by a large fortification ditch with four clearly defined bastions. Mandan villages along the Missouri River were connected to Canadian fur trading posts via the Mandan Trail.
Boundary Trail Visible - Sourisford
(1873) The Boundary Commissioner Trail is still visible in this location. It is used by a local farmer to run cattle down to the Souris River.
Yellow Quill Trail Continues
Yellowquill Trail continues west from this point. It meets up with the Carleton Trail at present-day Portage la Prairie.

Routes

Boundary Commission Trail
(Pre 1600 - 1885) The Boundary Commission Trail was the first “highway” to the west, carrying First Nations to and fro, Métis on buffalo hunts and finally Europeans looking for rich farmland.
Mandan Trail
The Mandan Trail was a primary artery of travel and trade between the Assiniboine River Forts and the Missouri River where the Mandan First Nations lived.
Yellow Quill Trail
(Pre 1790 - 1886) The Yellow Quill Trail began as a trade route used by First Nations but served as a convenient avenue of travel for pioneering Europeans as well.
Dunseith Trail
(1920 – 1933) Rum-runners used the Dunseith Trail to smuggle illegal alcohol into North Dakota in the days of alcohol prohibition.
Boiler Trail
(1880 – 1885) The Boiler Trail provided a detour around the muddiest section of the Boundary Commission Trail.