Heritage Features

Items Listed by Theme: Railways

Sites

Goodlands
(1899 – Present) This village grew up around the train station on the CPR line that led southwest from Deloraine.
Alcester
(1908 – 1936) Alcester was a stop on the Great Northern Railway line.
Argue
(1898 – 1961) Argue was known as "Trackend" for a year as it was the most westerly station on the Winnipeg-Carmen-Hartney Branch of the Canadian National Railway until 1900 when the line continued to Hartney and Virden.
Bannerman
(1905 – 1936) Bannerman served as the Canada Customs depot for travellers coming from North Dakota on the Great Northern Railway.
Boissevain
(1885 – Present) Cherry Creek was the name of this town before the CPR came through and renamed it after a Dutch financier.
Cadzow
(1886 - ) Cadzow was a stop on the Pembina Branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Cameron
(1902 – 1996) Cameron was a stop on the Lyleton Branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Coatstone
(1914 – 1961) Coatstone was a stop on the Wakopa Subdivision of the Canadian National Railway.
Coulter
(1901 – Present) Coulter was a station on the Lyleton Branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway. It grew into a small community.
Cranmer
(1900 – 1996) Cranmer was a stop on the Lyleton Branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Croll
(1914 – 1974) Croll was a station on the “Blue Flea” Line (CPR). Its Manitoba Pool elevator held 77 000 bushels.
Hathaway
(1913 – 1962) Hathaway was the name of a station on the “Blue Flea” Line of the CPR.
Dand
(1913 – 1962) Dand was a station on the CPR's “Blue Flea” line which grew into a small community.
Desford
(1908 – 1936) Desford was the name of a station along the Great Northern Railway.
Elva
(1891-Present) Elva was named after the first child to be born in the village.
Fairburn
(1908 – 1936) Fairburn was a stop on the Great Northern Railway line from St. John North Dakota to Brandon, Manitoba.
Adelpha
The Wakopa Subdivision of the Canadian National Railway reached Adelpha in 1905 and went no further until 1914. Adelpha was a hub of commercial activity during this time.
Grande Clairière Station
(1905 – 1961) When the railroad finally reached Grande Clairière, the station was established north of town.
Hartney
(1882 – Present) Hartney is a town with a vibrant history, pleasant present and bright future!
Hazeldean
(1914 – 1961) Hazeldean was a stop on the Wakopa Subdivision of the Canadian National Railway.
Kentner's Great Northern Railway Museum
Bill Kentner houses a Great Northern Railway Museum in his back yard northeast of Boissevain. He welcomes phone-ahead tours by donation.
Lauder
(1891) Two of the CPR lines met at Lauder in a “T” junction.
Leige
(1914 – 1961) Leige was a stop on the Wakopa Subdivision of the Canadian National Railway Line.
Leighton
(1892 - ?) Leighton was the name of a train station on the Pembina Branch of the Canadian Pacific Railroad.
Medora
Medora was a village on the Canadian Pacific Railway between Deloraine and Napinka.
Mountainside
(1914 – 1961) Mountainside was an early prairie community and a stop on the Wakopa Subdivision of the Canadian Northern Railway.
Napinka
(1891 – Present) At the crux of two railways, Napinka was at first thought destined to be a successful railway town.
Naples
(1886 - ?) Naples was a stop on the Pembina Branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Ninga
Orthez
(1913 – 1962) The McCabe elevator at this CPR station had a 55,000 bushel capacity, the largest on the "Blue Flea" Line.
Regent
(1913 – 1962) The Manitoba Pool elevator at the train station held a 88,200 bushel capacity.
Sanger
Sanger was a station of the CPR. The “Blue Flea” Line headed north from here.
Schaffner
(1914 – 1962) Shaffner was the name of a station on the “Blue Flea” line of the CPR.
St. John, ND
The Great Northern Railway connected St. John, North Dakota with Brandon, Manitoba.
Underhill
(1898 - ) The general store is all that remains of this community which grew around the train station on the Winnipeg-Carmen-Hartney Branch of the Canadian National Railway.
Wakopa
(1886 – 1960s) Old Wakopa moved to this location to be at the crux of two rail lines: the Canadian National and Great Northern.
Waskada
(1899 – Present) The first buildings in Waskada were a post office and grain elevator.
Whitewater Village
(1886 – 1960s) Whitewater village flourished on the shore of Whitewater Lake for over 75 years.
Wassewa
(1914 – 1961) Wassewa became the name of a train station on the Canadian National Railway, located nearby the Wassewa stopping place established by George Morton.
Pierson
The Town of Pierson was incorporated in 1891.
Lyleton
The CPR Lyleton Branch line reaching west from Deloraine terminated at Lyleton.
Deloraine
(1886-Present) The town of Old Deloraine relocated to this location to be on along the railroad.
Dalny
(1902 – 1970) Dalny was a station on the CPR’s Lyleton Subdivision branch line.
Alida, SK
(1907 – Present) Alida was the terminus of the Lauder-Alida Branch of the CNR. In 2006 it had a population of 106 people.
Melita
(1891-Present) The community of Manchester became Melita when it moved to be beside the railway.
CNR Continues
The Canadian National Railway continued east, linking the communities along the CNR Wakopa Subdivision with Greenway and eventually Winnipeg.
CPR Continues
The Canadian Pacific Railway continues east to connect with Winnipeg via Morden.
Horton
(1905-1960s) A small community grew around this CNR railway station.
CPR Continues West
(1891 – Present) From Melita, the CPR railway continues west to Estecan, SK.
CNR Continues East
(1898-1961) This branch of the CNR Railway came to southwest Manitoba from Winnipeg, via Carmen.

Routes

CNR-Hartney-Carmen-Winnipeg Branch to Hartney
(1900-1961) The Canadian National Railway was built past "Trackend" at Argue to reach Hartney from the east in 1900.
CNR Hartney-Carmen-Winnipeg Branch to Virden
(1905) The CNR built a bridge over the Souris River and reached Grande Clairière in the fall and Virden by Christmas.
CPR Lauder-Alida Branch
(1905-1976) The CPR built west of Lauder as far as Broomhill then continued to Tilston the following summer. A flood in the spring of 1976 took out the bridge at Bernice along with some of the track, which brought an end to the use of this Branch.
CPR Lauder-Alida Branch to Tilston
(1907-1976) The CPR from Lauder continued to Tilston in 1907. A flood in the spring of 1976 took out the bridge at Bernice along with some of the track, which brought an end to the use of this Branch.
CPR Lauder-Alida Branch to Alida
(19011-1976) The CPR continued to Alida, SK in 1911.
CNR Hartney-Carmen-Winnipeg Branch to Argue
(1898 – 1961) The CNR was built as far as Argue in 1898. Argue was known as “Trackend” while the future course of the line was debated. Delegations from Deloraine, Waskada, Melita and Hartney lobbied for the route to go to their respective towns.
CPR-Pembina Branch to Napinka
(1892) Work on a rail line past Deloraine was finally started, and headed to Napinka which displeased farmers in Melita.
Great Northern Railway
(1905 – 1936) The Great Northern Railway covered the almost 70 miles between Brandon, Manitoba and St. John North Dakota.
CPR Lauder Branch
(1912 – 1962) The Lauder Subdivision, also known as the “Blue Flea” Line. The Tracks were removed in 1975-6.
CPR-Pembina Branch to Boissevain
The CPR reached Boissevain in 1885.
CPR-Pembina Branch to Deloraine
The CPR reached Deloraine in 1886.
CNR-Wakopa Subdivision to Adelpha
The 51.8 miles of the Canadian National Railway from Greenway to Adelpha was completed in 1905.
CNR-Wakopa Subdivision to Deloraine
The 28 miles of the Canadian National Railway from Adelpha to Deloraine was completed in 1914.
CPR-Estevan Branch to Hartney
The Estevan Branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway reached Hartney from Brandon in 1890.
CPR-Estevan Branch to Saskatchewan
The Estevan Branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway reached Melita in 1891 and continued to the Saskatchewan border.
CPR-Lyleton Branch to Waskada
After much hard work, locals in Waskada convinced the CPR to build a rail line southwest of Deloraine. It reached as far as Waskada in 1900.
CPR-Lyleton Branch to Lyleton
Lyleton received service by rail in 1902, two years after the railway reached Waskada.