Eunola School #2

(1898-1962) In 1900 Eunola School moved from its first location to the second location, and then in 1918 it moved again to the third and present location.

Stories

#The doors of this rural schoolhouse have not remained entirely closed with the end of classes **1896 - 1962** Eunola is the last remaining one-room schoolhouse in the Rural Municipality of Edward. It is located about 13 kms north of [Pierson](article=pierson), just over a kilometre west of the Hwy 256. Unlike most rural schools, whose doors were closed permanently in the 1960s due to consolidation, Eunola continues to be a social centre. ##The Need for a Schoolhouse The first settlers to arrive in the district were often young men or young couples. For the first few years there was not much need for a schoolhouse, because there simply were not enough children to warrant one. However, by 1898 the situation had changed. Until a proper schoolhouse could be built classes were held in a vacant house that was rented from James Phair for the purpose. [[inline:right:eunola]] Eunola School moved around several times before settling at its present location. The original building cost $508 to build, and consisted of one room with three windows on either side. A porch on the south end of the school provided space for children to leave their winter boots and coats. Just beside the porch was a woodshed where the student who was hired (for a very small amount) to start the fire on cold winter mornings would get the wood for the potbelly stove. ##Setbacks In the early morning of April 1937 the school burned to the ground with all of its contents. The ...

#A settlement route turns into a local highway **1879—Present** In 1881 the railway reached Brandon–likely bringing cries of “Hallelujah!” to homesteaders who had intentions of heading west. However, after arriving in Brandon, there was still a lengthy distance to travel in order to reach the land available for settlement. The trail leading southwest from Brandon was known as the [Yellow-Quill Trail](article=yellow-quill-trail). This article, however, deals with the lesser-known Old Melita Trail which branched off of the Yellow Quill trail at Melita and struck out west. ##Established by Surveyors It is likely that the trail was first created by the [surveyors](article=manitoba-land-survey-systems) who travelled the area between 1879 and 1880, marking out the land into townships (blocks of 36 square miles). The wagon trail they left was deepened by the passage of dominion surveyors McArthur and Wilkins between 1880 and 1881 as they surveyed the townships into sections and quarter sections. The trail kept loosely to the road allowance between Townships 3 and 4, through Ranges 27-29 to the present-day Saskatchewan border. It ended close to the crossing of Gainsborough Creek, after which another trail led toward the Moose Mountains. The “Old Melita Trail,” as it came to be called, meandered gently; crossing streams and creeks, avoiding sloughs and ravines. ##A Path for Settlement Soon settlement-era transportation methods were seen using the trail: oxcarts, covered wagons and Red River carts. The heavy and constant use served to more clearly define the prairie track. As the land alongside the trail was settled, homesteads ...