Picnic Area by Canada Creek

(Post 1908) A plot of land nearby Canada Creek was used as a ball field and picnic area by the Metigoshe Métis Community.

Stories

**1908 - Present** The [Métis](article=rise-metis-identity) community on [Turtle Mountain](article=turtle-mountain) is somewhat unique. Its presence raises the question: How did this group of Métis come to settle here? The Métis differ from the average European settler in that they did not immigrate to the Canadian prairies. They were born here. [[inline:right:met-metis]] Red River was the first place that the Métis settled in number. In fact for several generations they made up the majority of the settlement’s population. The Red River Resistance in 1869 and the following North West Resistance of 1885 uprooted Métis families from their homesteads and scattered them in all directions. ##A Relationship with Turtle Mountain The Métis have a long history of interaction with the landform known as Turtle Mountain. To a [trapper](article=souris-river-fur-trade) working for the Hudson’s Bay or North West Company, Turtle Mountain and Whitewater Lake to the north were prime hunting grounds. Turtle Mountain was also important to the Métis as a part of their [bison hunting](article=metis-bison-hunt] activities. During the summer and fall hunting seasons the Métis grew familiar with the plains surrounding Turtle Mountain; the region was favoured by bison due to its rich grazing. As the decades of the 19th century progressed, the bison withdrew farther west due to increased human activity on the plains. Soon the Métis were travelling for weeks before encountering a herd. To cut down on travel, Métis began establishing winter camps on Turtle Mountain (and other such sheltered areas). From these impermanent camps they hunted the bison on the ...

#Fishing for Food, Legal or Not [[inline:right:canada-creek]] Lake Metigoshe has long been known for harbouring a large quantity of fish in its waters. It was even known as “Fish Lake” in the early days. So it should come as no surprise that the [Métis community](/stories/metigoshe-metis-community/) that developed around Metigoshe Lake after 1908 ate a lot of fish. It didn't take long for the Métis to learn that for about four days and nights every spring a plethora of spawning Jack and Sucker fish came bursting into Canada Creek. The fish crowded through the short creek on their way from Metigoshe Lake into Dromore Lake where they laid their eggs. When the time in spring came, the word was excitedly spread throughout the community and families gathered along the creek with washtubs and copper boilers to fill with fish. Returning home with the next year's supply, the catch was first cleaned before being canned in salt and vinegar or ketchup. Even the Suckers, which weren't generally caught to eat, tasted just like salmon after they had been canned. So though it all tasted good enough. . . this fishing practice was technically against the law. Fishing for Suckers wasn't illegal because they generally weren't sought after to eat. However, fishing for spawning Jack fish was illegal because of the impact it had on the fish species' reproductive cycle. Game wardens knew that the Métis were technically poaching the spawning fish, however they didn't go to the area to investigate unless there ...

The Metis have been permanently settling on Turtle Mountain for over a hundred years.